appreciation

Evaluations: Because We All Can Improve

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The holiday season has ramped up, and everyone is busy with work and personal obligations. It’s a time of busyness not just for our company, but also for education stakeholders in federal, state, and local agencies. But even in the midst of this joyful but harried time of year, QIP chooses to take a short hiatus from our day-to-day responsibilities to reflect on staff productivity and satisfaction over the past calendar year. Yes, the last two months of the year is the time when we conduct our annual staff evaluations.

In some organizations, evaluations are largely a formality, but we have a different perspective on the process. Evaluations offer our organization the opportunity to (1) evaluate individual productivity and work quality; (2) discuss the future direction of staff responsibilities; (3) assess staff satisfaction; and (4) gather feedback regarding how our people, projects, and organization are managed. 

At QIP, the evaluation process begins when each employee receives a written evaluation from his or her supervisor. The written draft is followed up by telephone meetings, during which staff members can discuss the evaluation with the supervisor and set goals for the following year.

As managers, we understand that a review—particularly when it comes to areas for improvement—can sometimes make people feel defensive, unappreciated, or undervalued . . . but we hope to convey the opposite: our employees are very much appreciated and valued. When conducting evaluations, we stress our belief that we can all improve in some way—and that includes the Principals. As such, we encourage staff to get the most out of the evaluation process by welcoming constructive feedback on both demonstrated strengths and areas in which they can grow and improve.

We also tell our staff to think seriously about how to set achievable goals for next year that are meaningful to both QIP and the employee. We are confident that all of our staff want to do a good job and improve their skills and performance. Our annual evaluation process contributes to our individual and collective development, and we encourage employees to embrace the process. It’s an opportunity to exchange perspectives, think about evolving roles within the company, and grow as valued professionals.

Thank You, Lunch Ladies and All Who Work to Help Others

“A thank you can change a life.” This assertion was shared by Jarrett Krosoczka during his 2014 TED Talk “Why Lunch Ladies are Heroes.” Krosoczka is the author of the Lunch Lady graphic novel series, and his talk and novels focus on the school lunch ladies who play an essential, but often overlooked, role in the education system. This reminded us of education data—essential for everyday district and school operations (such as planning, evaluation, and improvement), but often overlooked relative to other aspects of the education enterprise.

As emphasized in Krosoczka’s talk, lunch ladies do a lot more than serve chicken nuggets. More than 30 million kids participate in school lunch programs every day—that’s more than 5 billion lunches made each school year. In one district in Kentucky, where 67 percent of the students relied on schools to serve them meals each day during the school year, the lunch ladies retrofitted a school bus so they could feed 500 kids a day over the summer, when the children might not otherwise receive regular meals. Thank you, lunch ladies, for making the effort, and thank you to members of the data community for collecting the data that drives education decisionmaking and action.

Krosoczka’s presentation made us think about the unsung heroes in our lives. In the context of QIP, sometimes some of our staff become very busy with a large, important assignment. When we finish a big project, it is natural that we should thank the folks who worked on it—for example, the management planners, content leads, reviewers, editors, and graphic designers. But we sometimes forget to thank the people who didn’t work on that particular project, but carried the weight of all the other projects—also extremely important—that needed to be completed at that time, allowing others to focus on the large assignment. We want to take this opportunity to say thank you to everyone on the QIP staff—no matter which projects you happen to be involved in.

There are also many people beyond the work environment who deserve thanks. As Krosoczka states, “Before a child can learn, their belly needs to be full.” Who feeds your belly, literally or figuratively? Who helped you along your journey, but wasn’t noticed, or thanked, often enough because they were quiet and humble or, like the lunch ladies, didn’t have a high-profile position, even though their contributions to your life were real and meaningful?

Late November is a great time to share gratitude. Perhaps we should all reach out to the “lunch ladies” in our lives and share a heartfelt thank you. As shown in Krosoczka’s TED Talk, it can mean the world to someone, especially if they are feeling otherwise unnoticed or undervalued in our busy world.

[Source of TED Talk: https://www.ted.com/talks/jarrett_krosoczka_why_lunch_ladies_are_heroes]